Classics

A entertaining, stunning novel about a drop-out place in America. Hippies and wanna-bees, and their more or less chaotic attempt to drop out of a society they don't like. Smoking, talking wierd stuff. Flat stuff, basically. Wierd freeloaders arround them, of corse. And no possibility to get rid of them due to the "Love and Peace and a Place for Everyone" rule. After a while, the whole bunch is forced to leave the farm they are dwelling, and with an old school bus and two or three cars they'd head off for a farm in Alaska. They reach the place, yet have no clue how to survive. In the village, there are trappers and farmers with their own livestyle and their own rivalities, upon which some of the newcomers split up...

The way the novell is written gives the reader the impression Boyle must have been living such a livestyle. Everything sounds authentic, lively.

A journey into the traditional Japan, the time of the great Samurai warriors... The main character is a historic figure who existed & whom many places in Japan are related too.
This book is about a boy who went out to become a Samurai, his long way to achieve his golden goal and of course the problems & fights he had to stand. It is the story about his friend Matahachi too, who wanted to become a Samurai too but did not quite had the resistance to withstand his own desires. And it is the story of a deep love, unsatisfied over a long period. So, this book is full of action, philosophy and romance. Hmm, I read this just before going to Japan. Or was this book a reason more to go?

"The world is always fullfilled by the noise of the waves. The small fish who left themselfes handed over to the waves, they play and dance. But how knows the soul of the sea, hundred feet deep. Who knows its depth?"